Moon River


I took a bit of liberty with the title of this post. It isn’t about the Andy Williams’ song by that name. Sorry if I misled you.

This post is actually about a photograph I took of a bridge in South Korea. I had previously posted about going to Hahoe Village which is an UNESCO World Heritage Site.  The village lies within a loop of the Nakdong River.  Nearby is the town of Andong and it is there that we find Woryeong-gyo or the “reflection of the Moon on the river” bridge.  

The Woryeong-gyo, with a length of 387 m, crosses the Nakdong River and is the longest wooden pedestrian bridge in South Korea.

There is a legend associated with the bridge.  It is said that the construction style of the bridge resembles that of the mituri which is a type of traditional straw shoes made of paper, mulberry, bush clover, hemp, and rice straws. The legend speaks of a grieving wife who expressed her love for her deceased husband and her deep sorrow by making a pair of mituri sandals using her own hair.  The bridge, so they say, commemorates her act of devotional love.

So in short, the bridge is about romance.

Mituri sandals
Mituri sandals

I got there on a cold winter night and I did indeed get to see the reflection of the moon on the river.  It was indeed a beautiful and romantic spot.  I might have enjoyed it more if I was not busy shivering and bracing myself against the chilly blasts of wind coming off the water.  It took me many cups of ht tea later to feel warm again and to regain sensation in my fingers and exposed ears.

Still, despite the shivering, I managed to take this hand-held and long exposure photo of a pavilion located near the middle of the bridge.  Sure, it ain’t perfect but I am still rather pleased with how it came out.

Ladies and gents……….(drum roll)………… the spirit of ethereal love as seen at the pavilion of the “reflection of the Moon on the river” bridge  on the Nakdong River.

korea bridge
Pavilion on the Reflection of the Moon on the River Bridge. (Photo by LGS)
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10 thoughts on “Moon River”

  1. That’s a super photo and a charming legend! When I was in Japan a couple of years ago, we also spent 3 days in South Korea at the end of the trip but I was sick as a dog with flu the whole time I was there and scarcely left the hotel. So I didn’t see much except the DMZ right before we went to the airport!

  2. This is what I find lacking in many North American structures (natural or man-made) – romantic stories. We need a bridge, we build one. End of story.

  3. VioletSky,
    Thanks. I thought hard about what you said about North American structures not having romantic stories attached to it. It is an interesting point. I wonder why that is. The exception may be some stories from the First Peoples. Could be a cultural thing?

  4. Yes, there are some First Nations stories, but they may be more out west and up north than where I am. and most of those stories weren’t passed on to, or accepted by, the ‘white people’. We’ve lost a lot because of that I think.

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